Claim the privilege of hunting according to the dictates of your own conscience, and allow all hunters the same privilege;
let them practice how, where, or what they may.








Wednesday, October 12, 2011

The Range Reviews: Tactical: Wisdom to Help Prepare for Adversity

The world is changing, are you prepared?

The Range Reviews: Tactical: Wisdom to Help Prepare for Adversity

In preparation for the time that will inevitably fall upon us – sooner or later – every man must rely upon his own imagination, his own projection, and his own initiative. You will be able to come up with your own solutions particularly applicable to your personal conditions in the storm. One thing is certain. You will see the collapse of this inflation and that will mean the end of the era you have known. But you and your country can still be saved.

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Preserving and Tanning Small Hides

Albert Rasch,HunterThough he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained Capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.

Columbus Day: Little Known Facts

Columbus Day history and little known facts!
© 2011 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
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Once again, a cheery hello to all my friends!

I received an interesting email this morning, with several little known facts about Christopher Columbus, that I thought I might share with you.



I also added a few comments as a means of explanation, and elucidation.

Did You Know:





Columbus landed on October 12, 1492? Just to point out the obvious, that's why we celebrate it on that day.


His real name is Christoffa Corombo, but we call him Christopher Columbus. That's because we can't leave well enough alone.

Columbus Day is called Fiesta Nacional in Spain. That's because even if Chris was Italian, they (the Spaniards) funded the whole shebang.

Some of the Spanish Conquistador soldiers used a harquebus, which was an early musket. That's shouldn't even be a surprise to you. But did you know they carried some of the first known biological agents used against others? Yeah, the flu, scarlet fever, measles, small pox, and a little known but really big one, swine flu!

Columbus never set foot in U.S. soil, having first landed in the Bahamas. And here I thought it was the Dominican Republic, or better said, the island of Hispaniola.

It was his brother Bartholomew's idea, not Columbus’, to sail across the ocean. And did he ever get any credit?If it's any consolation, he didn't end up in prison either...

There are 22 states that don't celebrate Columbus Day. Politics, just politics...

Both the Nina and the Santa Maria were nicknames for the Santa Clara (Nina) and the Gallega (Santa Maria). And word is that there were women on all the boats!

We don't know what Columbus looked like since the paintings of him are not based on his actual looks. Certainly a man of steely gaze, steadfast determination, and a gambler's luck!

There you have it folks, some tidbits of information that you can share with your friends and family to entertain and delight!

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member:  Qalat City Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles, Albert A Rasch, Hunting in Florida


Albert Rasch,HunterThough he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.