Claim the privilege of hunting according to the dictates of your own conscience, and allow all hunters the same privilege;
let them practice how, where, or what they may.








Saturday, July 24, 2010

New Look for the Chronicles

© 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45 kd q!?5. trochronicles.blogspot.com

Hello everyone! Greetings from Kandahar!

Well, I thought it high time for a face lift and a new look for The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles. Though I was mighty pleased with the original template, I was, quite frankly, getting tired of it - maybe bored is a better choice of words.

So I saved the old template, (Just in case...) and fiddled around with this one. I'm still tweaking it. I'm not satisfied with the font colors that are the default ones, and you all know that I use a dark red color for quotes. Those will have to change; if I have a hard time with them, then so will many of you.

It got me to thinking about a couple of things while I was at it.


As bloggers, we are always trying to garner attention to our site by having good material and content. I think that it's a good idea to occasionally mix things up a bit with a new layout, or even a new template. I regularly switch the order of the "gadgets" on the side column, and for a while I would change the header picture once a month. This weekend for instance, had I been home and had full access to the net and computer, I would have used Blake's header since I am writing about fishing and fishing blogs.

Unless you one of those folks that tweak the html, you should have too much trouble switching from one template to another.  And unless you radically change the widths of your outside columns, you shouldn't have to redo any pictures or links you may have created. The Blogger gadgets adjust themselves.

I would appreciate it if you notice any glitches or anything that makes you stop and have to work to make out. I can't see some of the gadgets I know I have, but that is due to the MilNet filters... I think.

So to recap. Change things up a bit every now and again. Try a new layout, switch things around, maybe even give a different template a go!


Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles


Posts on The National Hunting and Fishing Day:

National Hunting and Fishing Day
Three Big Reasons
Hunting Facts and Figures
Hunter's Contributions Exceed 5 Billion Dollars

Saturday Blog Rodeo 7/24/10

© 2009-2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.
Saturday Blog Rodeo 07/24/10

Holy Smokes! Another week has come and gone and I am still in one piece even though the Talibannanas have tried their darnedest to blow me up. Silly zealots! Don't they know that Trix are for kids? And speaking of crazy stuff, how does Al Gore find the time to keep all this stuff coming up around his Internet?

Anyway, once again I bring to you the posts and commentaries that I found most entertaining and informative! And believe it or not, none of it has anything to do with Kid Rock, Lady GaGa, or wardrobe malfunctions!

NOTE: Those of you that have comments embedded within your post, I cannot comment on your blog because of the MilNet's filters. I'm really sorry that I can't comment because there are so many posts that I wish to leave a note on! Very frustrating...

So let's get started!

I found this blog through a series of "Blog Hops." You know, Blog Hops... when you jump from one blog to another through the comments page? Anyway, John Dollar fly fishes western North Carolina, and the pictures alone are well worth the visit! Check out his post "Seven Bridges Road": WNC Treasures, and enjoy the rest of his blog!

Image Credit: Joel DeJong
The following Blog deserves a post all its own. Joel DeJong's blog, A Year on the Fly is, in his own words, "Mixing my love of Fly Fishing with my need to practice my painting, the posts are centered around the subject of the flies used in the art of Fly Fishing." Beautiful work is all I have to say! He sells some of his work, and I can't imagine better decor for one's office.

Continuing with the fishing theme, I caught up with Troutrageous! It's a well put together blog with a lot of humor and great pictures. He says, "I'm usually good about trolling around the internet for trouty tasting news morsels..." And that he does, with notes and comments about all sorts of fishing related activities.

Image Credit: MuddlerMan
Adventures in Mudderland is MuddlerMan's flyfishing blog. "Don't really know where to start with this one folks. Sunday was an absolutely epic day of fishing." He fishes the Blue Ridge Parkway out their in the Appalachias. If you need any proof as to why MTR must be stopped, then see what would be destroyed; MuddlerMan's pictures speak far more eloquently than I ever can. Unfortunately I can't comment on his blog, so if any of you stop by, please let him know I appreciate his blog!

I guess we are going to do an all fishing Blog Rodeo after all!

Image Credit: Dave Mckenzie
One of the things that is just amazing to me, is the quality of the photography you find on blogs now-a-days. Bay Area Backwaters is a case in point. I am amazed by the depth of color, the composition, and the variety of photos! Just take a look at some of the fish that Dave Mckenzie has captured with his camera. Oh, he caught them first with hook and line, just to be clear.

Surprise! I was Blog Hopping and lo and behold who should appear? Why Outdoor Blogger Summit Founding Member Othmar Vohringer! Now here is a man that walks the walk, and does a lot of good talking about it too! BC Fishing Blog is OV's, what else, fishing blog. It is just chock full of his musings, ideas, commentaries, hints and advise. This is from the dean of British Columbia's outdoor sports! Check it out!

I am running out of time here folks. A war waits for no one. As that is the case, I will spotlight one more. Bigerrfish. "A gentle tributary awaits. A slow walk makes for a shower of knowledge, A man must teach these things to his boy." His post Ok But You Have to Share the Rod is a great father and son fishing trip story with lots of photos.

Here are a few more that I liked:
Blog Cabin Angler
Fishing with Dad
Fly and Fin
Midge Man's Fly Box

I actually have a dozen or more blogs to highlight, but it will have to wait until during the week. I may do them individually or in groups of a few just depending on the time I have.

Just a quick reminder to some of my new readers. Check out some of these older posts:
Bag your Limit, But Limit your Bag! Let's be good conservationists!
I Review the Nikon Monarch 8X42 Great binoculars at a very reasonable price!
Muzzy Phantom MX Righteous, bad, and totally tough broadheads that will definitely take care of business!

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Bagram Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

Friday, July 23, 2010

Freedom to Hunt and More

© 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5. trochronicles.blogspot.com
"The important thing on this side of the Atlantic or the other is that English-Speaking people find liberty in the air."
R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr

I found this in my In-Box on the 16th.

Freedom to Hunt and More

It's an article written by R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr, who is founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator. His new book, After the Hangover: The Conservatives' Road to Recovery, was published on April 20 by Thomas Nelson.

It's short, entertaining, and an interesting read.

Best regards,
Albert

Thursday, July 22, 2010

National Hunting and Fishing Day 9/25/10

.
National Hunting and Fishing Day
Saturday, September 25, 2010

With National Hunting and Fishing Day on my mind, I am going to have several posts concentrating on tips and ideas that you can use to help celebrate our sporting heritage.
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I urge everyone to do something along the way and especially on the 25th to further our mutual love for the outdoors. It can be something as simple as taking someone who has never fished out on a shoreline, lake, or pond, to perhaps giving a talk to school children on the conservation and preservation work that outdoor sportsmen do for the benefit of all.

Remember, it is all up to us to do what we can, because even the smallest thing you do, pays off in huge dividends!

Sincerely, your friend,
Albert A Rasch

Join Us in a Nationwide Celebration:
Hunt. Shoot. Fish. Share the pride!
With permission from NHFD

More than a century ago, hunters and anglers were the first to recognize that development and unregulated uses of wildlife were threatening the future of many species. President Theodore Roosevelt, a very active hunter and angler, supported the call for the first laws to restrict commercial harvest of wildlife. While enjoying National Hunting and Fishing Day, it may be worthwhile to consider the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation's seven basic principles, which enable you to have such great hunting and fishing opportunities:


  • Fish and wildlife are public resources. Throughout the United States, wildlife is held in common ownership by the state for the benefit of all people.



  • Markets for trade in black bass and other wildlife and sportfish are carefully restricted, removing a huge threat to sustaining those species.



  • States allow sustainable use of sport fish and wildlife by law, not by market pressures, land ownership or special privilege. The public has input into how these resources are allocated.



  • The democracy of hunting is emphasized. In North America, anyone in good standing may participate.



  • Hunters and anglers fund conservation, including protections for wildlife species that are not harvested, by purchasing hunting and fishing licenses and paying excise taxes on recreational equipment.



  • Many fish and wildlife species are an international resource. Species, such as migratory fish, transcend boundaries, requiring cooperative management.



  • Science is the proper tool for developing fisheries policy. This is a key concept of fish and wildlife management emphasized by Theodore Roosevelt, Aldo Leopold and many other conservation leaders.



  • In the 37 years since Congress formalized National Hunting and Fishing Day, a variety of celebrities have volunteered to serve as honorary chairman, lending their fame to help build public support for sporting traditions. Sports pros, actors and other personalities have served (see list below). But history shows that country music/entertainment has produced the most flag-bearers for the hunting, fishing and conservation community.

    That’s no surprise, according to a marketing exec with Capitol Records Nashville. She says country music, like hunting and fishing themselves, reflects a lifestyle. Other genres are more about emotion and instrumentation. Luke Bryan, the country sensation who proudly presided over the Sept. 26, 2009, celebration of NHF Day, is a case in point. Bryan’s hunting and fishing passions helped shape him as an artist, and continue to influence his path to stardom. “I feel very proud to be a part of this,” said Bryan. “I’m looking forward to the coming year. I hope to help grow awareness of what hunters and anglers do for conservation, and just promote hunting and fishing overall. "

    Wonders of Wildlife, in Springfield, Mo., is the official home of National Hunting and Fishing Day. The museum coordinates public education and awareness campaigns to promote traditional outdoor sports.

    The growing list of sponsors for National Hunting and Fishing Day 2010 includes Wonders of Wildlife, National Shooting Sports Foundation, Bass Pro Shops, The Sportsman Channel, Realtree, GunBroker.com, Hunting Heritage Trust, Cabela’s, Boone and Crockett Club, Smith & Wesson, Field & Stream, Outdoor Life, Woolrich, and Yamaha.



    Related posts on The National Hunting and Fishing Day:

    National Hunting and Fishing Day
    Three Big Reasons
    Hunting Facts and Figures
    Hunter's Contributions Exceed 5 Billion Dollars

    Regards,
    Albert A Rasch
    Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
    The Hunt Continues...


    The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

    Monday, July 19, 2010

    Traditions: A Defense of Hunting

    © 2010 Albert A Rasch and
    The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
    $g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5. trochronicles.blogspot.com

    I have always considered traditions as an important part of my hunting, fishing, and family. My personality and persona are crafted and influenced by those traditions that I was taught, learned, and made mine.

    As I have mentioned previously, I was brought up in New York City, in a non-hunting family. My "Traditions" came from the books I read in the library on indigenous peoples, magazines like Outdoor Life and Field and Streams, and the occasional chance meeting with someone who hunted or fished.

    I consider "Traditions" almost unassailable. Yet I also recognise that some things are harmful and inappropriate in today's world.

    (By the way, in case you are wondering, bull fighting isn't one of them...)

    Phillip Loughlin of the Hog Blog has an interesting piece on the use of the "Traditions" defense in arguing for certain traditional methods of hunting. The post originated in part from a remarkable series of comments on Tovar's post on A Mindful Carnivore, When Hunters Ruin the Hunt. I managed the first dozen comments before being pulled away, but you may rest assured that I will be printing it all out before the night is done for my full consideration. I would suggest that you go there first to read the post, and then the comments.

    I would attempt to recap it here, but I would ask everyone to read A Mindful Carnivore, then go over to the Hog Blog and read his post "The Value of Tradition."

    As usual Phillip is logical and insightful and then challenges us to add to the discussion with our own comments and ideas:

    "I’m also asking for folks to share some of the hunting traditions that underlie their practices, habits, and motivation for the hunt. How was it passed down, and how will you pass it along? If you don’t come from a hunting environment, or don’t have the background of a hunting tradition, what sorts of things might you pass along as a mentor to other hunters?" Phillip Loughlin


    Best Regards,
    Albert A Rasch
    Member Kandahar Tent Club
    Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
    The Hunt Continues...

    The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

    Sunday, July 18, 2010

    Mountain Top Removal: Protecting Our Streams

    © 2010 Albert A Rasch and
    The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
    $g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5. trochronicles.blogspot.com

    Hi Guys,

    I haven't visited this topic for some time, and I wanted to touch base with everyone on this.

     Let's get a few things out on the table right quick - facts not opinions.

    • The coal that is being gouged out of the mountains is a high grade, low sulphur, hard coal that is being shipped to China for steel production. It has nothing to do with energy production what-so-ever.
    • By using mountain top removal techniques, the amount of labor required to extract the coal is one twentieth of what was required. So it cost jobs, it doesn't create them.
    • Miles and miles of streams have been buried as the mountains have been flattened, to say nothing of the thousands of acres of hardwood forests that have been destroyed.
    I feel very comfortable calling "Bullshit" on anyone that screams about energy independence or jobs when I say we need to stop the rape of the Appalachia.

    From my friends at I Love Mountains:

    "In late 2008 President Bush's administration gutted the Stream Buffer Zone rule, which protected our nation's streams and waterways from the worst of coal industry abuses.

    The old rule was a good rule - but it was never properly enforced. Today, however, instead of reinstating and enforcing the old stream buffer zone rule, the Obama administration is proposing totally new guidelines that would regulate how -- and whether -- America's streams can be filled with waste from mining operations.

    But before they'll write the new regulations, the administration has decided to gather information for an Environmental Impact Statement. To that end, the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) is requesting your opinion on what requirements a new stream protection rule should include.

    Click hear to comment today and demand that our streams stay clean of toxic mining waste:
    Comments on stream protection.

    This is a tremendous opportunity to make your voice heard on the kind of protections our streams deserve -- before the rule is written.

    Please, take just a few minutes today to make sure that your views are taken into account and our streams are protected from the devastation of mountaintop removal coal mining."

    Look folks, we all agree that nature needs to be conserved. I don't believe that any of us object to an appropriate use of natural resources in a sustainable fashion. But to destroy countless trout streams, despoil hardwood groves and wild ginseng plots, knock the tops off of mountains... there has to be limits on what is done.

    Take a moment and let your voice be heard!

    Late Addition! If you need further proof of Massey energy's lies about energy production, I just read about Blankenship's purchase of a West Virginia coal shipping dock that will reduce transportation costs. The purchase is part of Massey Energy's plan to concentrate its efforts on the sale of metallurgical coal to foreign steelmakers! That's from their website by the way.

    Related Posts:
    Wild Hogs: Not Tough Enough to Face Ol King Coal

    Best Regards,
    Albert A Rasch
    Member Kandahar Tent Club
    Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
    The Hunt Continues...

    The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles