Claim the privilege of hunting according to the dictates of your own conscience, and allow all hunters the same privilege;
let them practice how, where, or what they may.








Saturday, July 11, 2009

Jason Miller is a Big Fat Idiot... Well He's Really Not Fat.

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

Jason Miller is a Big Fat Idiot... Well He's Really Not Fat;
But he is Quite Possibly a Terrorist.

$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.
Once again while digging for information I bumped into what seems to me to be a statement of terroristic reasoning and justification, as as bad any I have ever seen.

Jason Miller, erudite user of three dollar words and semi-colons, is the mouth piece for the North American Animal Liberation Press Office. The NAALPO "was founded to communicate the actions, strategies, and philosophy of the animal liberation movement to the media and the public." Press Office Directive, http://www.animalliberationpressoffice.org/Background.htm In other words, he gets "anonymous" missives from terrorists, and puts them out for public consumption. Only in America, the land of freedom, can you pull that stunt off!

If any of you have ever questioned the motives of the animal rights movement you were right to do so. In Jason Miller's treatise, if you could call it that, "To dam the torrential rivers of blood and to silence the cacophony of their agonized cries…." http://thomaspainescorner.wordpress.com/2009/07/05/to-dam-the-torrential-rivers-of-blood-and-to-silence-the-cacophony-of-their-agonized-cries%E2%80%A6/ (No links for terrorists.) Miller lays out the patented Jason Miller vision and plan of destruction, murder, and mayhem.

"Destruction of property, equipment, buildings, machinery, laboratories, and virtually any inanimate human construct or “resource” used in the exploitation, oppression, maiming, raping, or murder of human animals, other animals, or the Earth is not violence. It may be illegal under a system that fetishizes property and profits, but it is not unethical. In fact, in many cases it is the right thing to do."

As if destruction of personal property isn't enough, he goes on to advocate the following:

"...the animal liberation movement needs to embrace ‘counter-violence to protect innocent beings’ as one of many tactics in the war to end the animal holocaust. Attacks on incorrigible, empathy-deficient, sociopathic speciesist animal torturers and murderers by courageous underground militants are both necessary and morally acceptable aspects of the fight to liberate nonhuman animals. From an ethical standpoint, such acts would be readily justifiable as a form of extensional self-defense on behalf of voiceless, defenseless sentient beings."

"Courageous underground militants?" Isn't that an oxymoron?

"As ridiculously out-numbered as we are, and in light of the overwhelming power of our enemy, we need to confront this multi-headed hydra with as many tactics of asymmetrical engagement and with as much determination as we can muster, battling them within the framework of the inherently corrupt political and legal systems that are heavily stacked in the favor of anthropocentric murderers... and undertaking various forms of direct action on behalf of the billions of nonhuman animals immiserated and annihilated by speciesist capitalism every year."

That, is guerrilla warfare plain and simple.

Look, I don't know about you guys, but either this guy is delusional or a madman. At the very least he comes from wealthy parents, who probably catered to his every whim, thereby creating a guilt ridden sociopath, very much like Hitler.

I looked through several of his "posts," (I bet nobody plagiarizes that stuff!), and what I found was a complicated series of often times disjointed thought, all filled with complicated sentence structures, and devoid of simple, direct, logical expressions. It is as if he is trying to obfuscate what he is trying to say by filling it with big words, many of which don't even make sense. Miller's writing reminds me in many ways to other revolutionary tracts that are heavy on rhetoric, and light on reason.

Like any violent criminal, Jason Miller likes to disguise his affiliations or involvement with terroristic groups. Notice the disclaimer he uses:

"Disclaimer: I am in no way affiliated, allied, aligned, or connected with the Transformative Studies Institute, the Institute for Critical Animal Studies, Anthony Nocella II, or Richard Kahn. While I am a press officer for the North American Animal Liberation Press Office and am an associate of Jerry Vlasak and Steve Best, I am penning this piece independently of NAALPO and all of my allies." The Best of Jason Miller


These are dangerous people. People with no compunctions to enslave others to do their bidding. The FBI is right in considering them the number one domestic threat.

By the way Jason, should you read this, if you decide to come around here and try to engage in dialogue, it just isn't going to happen for you. Folks like Brendan, Ms. Doris, and some others I allow. But a terrorist, never. I took an oath to Serve and Protect this Nation from all Enemies, Foreign and Domestic. You fall into the category of Domestic Enemy. You advocate the murder of innocent people, animals if you will, thereby abrogating you claim that you stand for all animals. You, Jason Miller, are an anarchist bent on the destruction of social order, and the death of all animals, both human and non-human.

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Friday, July 10, 2009

A Eulogy for Shifty Powers

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.


Those of you that are World War Two historians, will know the name Shifty Powers. Irons in the Fire has posted a wonderful eulogy and remembrance of the "Best Damned Shot in Easy Company." To few real American Heroes are left, and Irons had the opportunity, nay the honor, of meeting one. Go read his post. A Eulogy for Shifty Powers

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Protect Yourself from Plagiarism: Part I

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
How to Protect Yourself from Plagiarizers and Plagiarism

Everyone that has visited with me here at The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles has seen how plagiarism can really distract you from the important things in life, like writing. Fortunately I have the time and resources to go after someone and take them down. But what if I didn't? What could I have done to minimize the damage done, or at least wrest control of my work form the criminal?
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.
 
I will admit, that I got quite the lesson on the seedier side of Al Gore's Internet over the last week. I've learned a lot about aggregators, sploggers, spammers, content thief, RSS feeds link strippers, and a host of other web based things that I didn't really even want to know. But I did learn about some tools and tactics to use against plagiarists and content thieves.

Let's start with the basics.

Everyone should have the following or something similar at the header of each and everyone of their posts:

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
Obviously, do that with your name and the link to your home page not mine.

That you posted your work, is in and of itself enough to legally protect you under copyright laws, but here you are showing that you take it seriously and at least your link is on you post.

Next, you should have at least one link to something else you have done. Have a "Related Posts" section at the bottom of your post. I do it manually; there are other platforms that do it automatically. Also, don't be afraid to link to other people’s stuff that relates to what you are doing. Some people are better than others when it comes to checking who has linked to them. I can't seem to figure it out myself, but John over at For Your Entertainment does a very good job of it. He knows who's linking to who.

Now that you have done the very basics, you can get a little more sophisticated. Come up with a key phrase that you use in your posts. One of them could be a closing phrase that you use to end your posts. I have been using:

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

For some reason though, that doesn't help when I do a google search. But I really like the whole thing so its going to stay! So now I am working on a good unique phrase that I can place on my posts to further identify them in a search, which leads to the following.

You can use the equivalent of an electronic fingerprint. Create a random series of digits and paste them one paragraph down, between the first and second paragraph. Go up and look at mine. It's between the criminal and the Let's. Oh wait, you don't see it? Take your cursor and highlight that area. Tah dah!

I've colored it close to my background color, and I've made it small. That should be sufficient to allow the spiders to crawl and categorize it.

The next step is to create an email alert for your phrase. Wait about an hour after posting to your blog. Go to GoogleBlog Search and type in your fingerprint phrase. Of course, at first phrase only that one post will appear because you just made it up. But with time any other posts you fingerprint, and any plagiarized, hijacked, ripped or otherwise misappropriated copies of your work will quickly appear on GoogleBlog Search.

So now you have placed in your work the basic protections against copyright infringement. But what do you do if you find your materials on a website with or without credit? In our next installment we are going to look at some of the help that is available for you to wrest control of your work back. There are even a couple of tactical nuclear strikes available to you. Trust me it's fun!

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


TheRange Reviews: Sprinco USA 1911 Recoil Springs

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
We Test and Install the Sprinco USA 1911 Recoil Spring

A properly tuned 1911 Automatic is unquestionably the finest combat pistol in the world.
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.
I've owned my Colt Combat Government for about thirty years. I wore it on and off through out my misspent and tumultuous youth in New York City and Miami. The bluing is a little worn around the sharp edges near the muzzle, and it has a couple of honestly earned scratches, but other than that, it is the one firearm that I pick up first regardless. No kidding, I can shoot you in the eye at 21 feet and if you stand still long enough I can shoot you in the other eye.

I have put approximately 1500 rounds through it, all of them 230gr ball. Recently I added the Buffer Technology 1911 buffer, which is something I highly recommend now, and I felt that it was time that the recoil spring was also replaced. Recoil springs have a life of 3000 to 5000 rounds so I was well within the lifespan, but better safe than sorry.

I got in touch with Alan Dugger of Sprinco USA for some advice. After a bit of discussion, Alan forwarded a selection of Sprinco 1911 Recoil Springs for my evaluation.

Note the different color ends on the springs, and the color code dot on the labels.
Nice touch Sprinco USA.


Sprinco 1911 Recoil Springs are manufactured from a chromium-silicon alloy that is noted for it's hardness and superior performance at extremely high temperatures and stresses. Because of it's heat resistance and hardness, the alloy is used in valve springs and automatic transmissions that operate at temperatures well over 275F. Chrome-silicon was originally developed for recoil springs in anti-aircraft guns where high resistance to environmental degradation, shock loads, and long life is needed. A nice feature by Sprinco is the color coded packaging by weight for easier field I.D. by the shooter. In addition, the recoil springs come packaged in hard plastic tubes for easier transportation. The springs also have a corresponding color for the spring weight as well.

One thing that deserves mention by itself is the extreme duty cycle of the Sprinco chromium-silicon alloy recoil springs. This alloy provides excellent service for applications in the 5,000 to 50,000 cycle ranges. How's that for longevity?

How do you decide what weight of spring to use? The correct recoil spring poundage is important to the reliability of your pistol. Changes in the weight of the slide and barrel, like changing them may require a new spring. If you add barrel weights or a compensator, scopes or an optical sight attached directly to the slide, or if you change your ammunition to something stronger or weaker, it may require a change in spring weight. Too light a spring will beat the pistol and weaken the chambering process; too heavy a spring will result in failures to extract and eject, or in "stovepipe" stoppages. Your best bet is to use the heaviest spring possible while maintaining reliable function. But a spring that is too heavy will pummel the extractor. The rapid closing of the slide will force the extractor over the rim of the cartridge, rather than allowing the cartridge to slide under the extractor with a smooth controlled motion. It also slams the slide into the slide stop unnecessarily.

A good field indicator is how far the ejected cases land from you. Less than three feet indicate the spring is too heavy, while more than six feet means you need a heavier spring. Remember, a spring that is too light will ultimately damage your 1911.

New spring is almost a full coil longer than factory original.

The stock recoil spring in a standard 1911 is rated at 16 pounds. Moving up one notch to 17 or 18 pounds will be about right for most pistols shooting hardball and other full-power defense ammo. Anything heavier is too much. Be sure to test the new recoil spring by shooting the pistol one-handed and loosely. It should function positively. If not, go back to the 16-pound spring.

Locking the recoil spring in place.

Guide, Buffer Tech 1911 Buffer, and Sprinco 17lbs Recoil Spring.


In my particular case I shoot standard full power ball ammo for practice, and I use Winchester Supreme T-Series as my defensive load. The Supreme T is a full power load with a 230gr hollow point. It leaves the muzzle at almost 900 fps, and is a formidable defensive round. I put in the 17 pound recoil spring from Sprinco, lubricated the slide with Machine Gunner's Lube and headed to the range.

Colt Government Combat with its new Sprinco Recoil Spring


I noticed that there was a definite difference in the tension of the spring, One pound difference is noticeable when racking the slide. Upon firing, the Colt was as smooth as ever. Empties were ejecting without a hitch, and every round chambered flawlessly.

When you are ready to change your 1911's recoil spring, give Sprinco USA a call and order yourself one. A spare spring should also be part of your 1911 kit.

Sprinco USA
1-800-397-9530

Sprinco 1911 Recoil Spring
MSRP: $7.95

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Instincts and Hunting

© 2009, 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.

"In a very real sense our intellect, interests, emotions and basic social life - all are evolutionary products of the success of the hunting adaptation."
SL Washburn and CS Lancaster

All the PeTA drama of the last couple of weeks, plus the great intellectual stimulation that I have been fortunate to have when discussing animal issues with Brendan of Screaming Chicken Activism, got me to think more deeply as to why I hunt. I think it was Brendan that mentioned to me that I really didn't need to hunt, and that he thought there was a dichotomy in the desire I have to hunt and kill, and my love of animals.

I believe that when I made the comment that it just sort of came to me. I know it was late and I was tired, so it was more subconscious than deduced and thought out. The answer that I gave him was that I have always been a hunter, even as a child. Not in the sense that I was formally inducted into the hunting fraternity by cousins, uncles, or my dad, no one in my family hunts. But ever since I was very young I stalked animals, bugs, people, birds, even fish. My mother got plenty of phone calls, and not more than a few visits from concerned parents and the occasional cop with young Albert in tow! I don't remember how many bows I made from anything remotely flexible, and the scar on my thumb is from a Gillete single edge razor blade that sliced me down to the tendon while I was sharpening arrows made from bamboo.

As I have been contemplating this, it occurred to me to question how much of that was some deep instinctual behavior, versus an observed or learned one. Well, it seemed to me to be more an instinct than anything else. First, I had no role models to instill the desire to hunt in me. Television in the sixties did not have Sportsman Channel or Outdoor Channel. As a matter of fact it was black and white for those of you that aren't familiar with non cable TV! Another factor would be that I was raised in New York City. I only recall two times that I saw a hunter with a deer strapped to the hood of the car. It wasn't like my neighbors encouraged hunting as a leisure activity.

So where did my instinct to hunt come from then?

Why it has to be from the Paleolithic Era of course!

We have been "civilized" for a little over 10,000 years. But for 2.6 million years before that, we were little more than roving bands of hungry humans looking for our next meal.

2.6 million years as Homo Sapiens, but about 5 million years if you include Homo Habilis, followed by 10,000 years of so called civilization, that has also been punctuated by famines, diseases, and pestilence. 5 million years of evolution and not much has really changed as far as I can tell in the 0.5% of time we have been "civilized."

I'm thinking that my instinct theory is getting some traction here. If all humans are animals, then it stands to reason that we have some instincts left. Just because we are the only reasoning animal on the planet, doesn't mean that we have no instincts left. I and many others must still feel the pull of the outdoors and the need to pit our abilities, as considerable as they are, against nature.

That we don't need to hunt may not be an accurate statement. I am now, more than ever convinced that we not only need to hunt, but it is unnatural to subvert or suppress that need or instinct. As I told Brendan, I could no more be a non-hunter, than he could be a carnivore. Though I think that it might be easier for Brendan to eat a hunk of steak if he was hungry enough and not suffer much emotional discomfort, than it would be to keep me from the outdoors. I think that is very indicative of the importance of the instinct, the natural desire to be the top predator in nature's tapestry.

The more I think about this, the more I conclude that to deny the nature of being human, that is to deny the parts of us tat are still driven by instinct, is just asking to be sick both emotionally and physically. If any of us was forced to forego our basic human nature, physical and emotional harm would soon follow.

For me it all boils down to this: I am a hunter. I am driven by a passion greater than that of those around me because I acknowledge and accept that which nature bestowed upon me. As long as I treat nature and her gift to me with respect, I will continue to be whole... and human.

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Kandahar Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles




Though he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.


Best Regards,
Albert Rasch™
Veteran Paints Lures in Smokin' Hot Colors!

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch™
TROC: Helping Bird Rescuers

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch™
Spoons: They're Not Just for Cereal!




Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Drumsticks and Thighs a La TROC

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
Oven Roasted Drumsticks and Thighs

First things first.

If you came here wanting something more than a cheap, quick and easy meal, go to "Hunter Angler Gardener Cook" where resident chef Hank Shaw, really knows his cooking. I'm almost embarrassed to post stuff like this...

I'm of the "where there's fire, there can be cooking," school of thought; where there is little preparation and the fixings are limited to the salt, pepper, garlic, and hot sauce in my rucksack.

This is one of my favorite things to make. It requires minimum preparation, and no participation once the oven starts. But it sure comes out tasting pretty darned good! So lets dive right into one of my favorite brown bag lunches: Drumsticks and thighs!

I have the Mrs. buy me the five pound bag of chicken thighs and drumsticks at the market. Here abouts a five pound bag is only $5.00 to $5.50. Normally they're pretty cheap compared to the boneless skinless stuff in the case. They are nowhere near as good as the home-grown or organic chickens, but you can't beat the price. It's an economical meal; the chicken is inexpensive, the spices are pennies and the oven time is about 90 minutes. But it's lunch for a week!

Preparation is rudimentary. Cut the package open, rinse the pieces off, and set them in the pan. 90 minutes later, they are cooked through and through.

The most "Complicated" or "Labor Intensive" portion is the mashing of the garlic. You need lots of it if you intend to keep the mosquitoes, gnats, leeches, and vampires away. I use about half a head of garlic for five pounds of chicken. There is no hard and fast rules here by the way. You can do this just about anyway you like, as long as it is cooked through and through.

(NOTE: See the comments where Chef Hank Shaw, ummm, makes a suggestion or two!
It would seem that I'm a blasphemer...)

A teaspoon of salt is more than enough!

In a mortar, (For you guys with the Tactical bunch, I'm talking about the kitchen implement not the indirect fire weapon.) put about a teaspoon of salt, enough olive oil to satisfy your penchant for it, and the pieces of garlic you thoughtfully cut up previously on the cutting board.

Take pestle in hand and start crushing and grinding the garlic. Notice how the salt helps to keep the garlic from slipping and sliding around!

Use an inexpensive wine for this!

When the garlic mash starts to get a little too thick for you to see whats going on, splash a little inexpensive white wine on it. Go back to liquefying that garlic. If you own one of those little food processor things this might be a good thing to use it on. I don't know that I would, being that I like to minimize the amount of utensils I dirty, but this really is the longest part of the operation!

Lay them out nicely...

Get a pan out, and lay the chicken in such a fashion that the majority of it is not covered by another piece. When they are all nice and even, splash a bit of that white wine all over them.

Did I mention lots of garlic?

Go to your garlic mush and spread it out nicely all over your chicken pieces, paying special attention to those spots that you first sink your teeth in.

A little paprika for color..

Now finish by adding a little salt, pepper, paprika, or anything else that you feel I have missed! Like I said, no hard and fast rules here!

Now what I do is set the oven to 350 and set the timer for an hour, and slide the pan full of chicken right into its warm embrace

Baste it at about an hour.

When the hour alarm buzzes, grab a ladle or long spoon, and carefully baste the chicken, making sure you cover all of it. Rotate the pan 180 degrees so you are certain of good heat coverage. Set the alarm for thirty more minutes.

Check again at the end of thirty minutes and see if your chicken is done, if not give it another five to ten minutes.

Ta dah! All done!

When you are satisfied that it is done, pull the whole pan out of the oven. Get a large bowl ready. Using tongs (Remember they are hot!) pick up all the chicken and put it in the bowl. The grease and liquid that's left will go into another smaller bowl. Let the chicken cool for fifteen-twenty minutes, cover with foil, and put away in the fridge. The chicken fat and gelatin will have cooled some too so cover it and set it in the fridge.

You can feed the fat to your cat or dog, but save the gelatin for soups, omelets, making rice, gravy, anything that you get a hankering for. One of these days I'm going to try some in a loaf of bread.

Now you have a bunch of delicious drumsticks and thighs that you can eat cold, or heat up and add to any kind of filler material like potatoes, rice, noodles, or even crackers. Its a money saver that's for sure, and it really is a tasty way to prepare them.

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Tactical Arms from Sportsman Channel

Tactical Arms from the Sportsman Channel

I just received via FedEx Episode 2 of the Sportsman Channel new series Tactical Arms. It actually debuted on June 30th, but due to a series of logistical issues, (and my relatively low position on the totem pole...), I got episode 2 instead of episode 1. Well, I guess I'm in good company if Sportsman Channel decided I should get one at all.

Sportsman Channel is available to something like 17 million homes. Most providers carry it including DIRECTV and Bright House. Look for it on Thursday evenings.

I'm going to watch it this evening and report on it tomorrow!

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Monday, July 6, 2009

Serial Killer on the Loose in South Carolina

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
"If he comes to me, face to face, I'm ready, I'm loaded, and I'm aimed for him," said Sarah Banister, neighbor of one of the killer's victims.
Artists Rendering of Suspect

There is a murderous psychopath on the loose in and near Gaffney SC. Having murdered five people already, practical minded citizens are armed and ready, and traveling in groups.

Over 1000 leads have been given to the investigators, who set up a special command with state law enforcement officials. Over 100 law enforcement personnel are assisting in the investigation. The Cherokee County Sheriffs department has canceled all vacations and leaves until the killer is apprehended.

I am speculating now: According to the reports, the killings are related. If this was a revenge type of affair, the serial killer may have already left the area. Please be aware that he may have already left that area and is traveling elsewhere. With his picture everywhere, there is a good chance that he is aware that his face is becoming well known. He may become desperate.

Do not approach even if you are well armed!
You are not a gunfighter! Call law enforcement, observe and communicate.

The only advice I can offer is to use common sense.

Stay armed at all times.
Move in groups.
Secure your perimeter repeatedly.
Lock the house down, check the windows.
Let people know you are leaving, what route you are taking, and when you expect to arrive.

Be prepared. Stay safe.

Update
CNN reports that a suspect has been shot and killed deader than a doornail. Police are investigating and correlating information:

Jennifer Timmons of the South Carolina Law Enforcement Divison told CNN there was no immediate confirmation of any link to the serial killer case. "Processing any crime scene is going to take a while," she noted.

One officer was wounded in the action, but due to good trigger control the police officers put them in the perp's firebox and hopefully ended his reign of terror!

Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Sunday, July 5, 2009

Posts of Note: Cow Town Cop Bobs a Hammer

© 2009 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
.
Folks,

One day I got something like 90 hits above the average number. Curious I looked it up on Analytics, and lo and behold, Cowtown Cop had linked to me and told his readers. Well it's about time I returned the favor.

CTC has a great layout and tutorial series on bobbing the hammer on a lightweight Smith and Wesson 327 in .357 Magnum. He wanted to adapt it to a better belly gun, you know, the kind of last ditch or undercover type of blaster that will get you out of a tight spot. The hammer spur had to go and the grips smoothed out for quick retrieval.

Check it out:

Photo Credit: CtC
Photo Credit: CtC
Photo Credit: CtC
Take a good look at CTC. This is great tutorial and it's in a great blog.

Tomorrow on the Chronicles!

Tomorrow we will be looking at several species of the Rat, members of the Genus rattus and Order rodenti. We will take look at the fascinating members of the Genus, some that you might not be familiar with but that you should be aware of!

Best Regards,
Albert
The Hunt Continues...

Let’s Get This Plagiarizer!
Mark Osterholt and Wayne Rommel are Stealing Your Content