Claim the privilege of hunting according to the dictates of your own conscience, and allow all hunters the same privilege;
let them practice how, where, or what they may.








Saturday, November 27, 2010

Saturday Blog Rodeo 11/27/10

© 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.

Special Craftsman's Edition!
Saturday Blog Rodeo 11/27/10

Well, I did it again, I got ahead of the game this week! Since it worked as well as it did last week, I figured I might as well do it again! Once again, as is my habit, I've roamed the ephemeral nether regions of the hunting and outdoorsmen's internet. And as you might imagine, I've picked out posts that I especially enjoyed this past week from all of blogs I follow, and some that I found. This week I am highlighting the craftsmen I try to emulate, but fail at miserably!

(Remember if you bump into a post you especially like, drop me a note and I'll include it in the Rodeo. You can even feel free to copy this whole post and run it on your own blog; it spreads the word, and it's always nice to give a little link love to your fellow bloggers!)

I might add that not a single one of you has ever taken me up on that offer!

Let's see if we might change that this week eh?

So without further adieu, lets get started!
First up is Wonderful Whittlin'. John G is an accomplished wood carver. I first bumped into John's blog while I was looking at walking sticks. Why was I looking at walking sticks? I don't know, I just was! He had just finished his woodspirit walking stick project and I thought it wonderful. I have always liked carved walking sticks and staffs, and one of these days I may commision one. All of my walking sticks are basically sanded and oiled branches I have picked up in my wandering about. I have an umbrella stand full of them at home by the entry. John's work though, takes it to another level with his fanciful and playful designs! By the way, take a look at that handsome carving knife in the picture.

Next up is my old friend Todd at Primitive Point. As I am sure you all are tired of hearing, Todd actually got me started blogging. At the time I didn't know the medium existed, but through a discussion in a forum he and I frequented, he introduced me to the concept. He's a school teacher during the day, but in his spare time he is a bladesmith. Two things come to my mind when Todd hammers out a workingman's blade at his forge: practical and rugged. His forte is Scandi styled knives and integrals. I think enough of his skill and ability to ask him to consider forging a back-up knife for me. Nuff said.

Nehawka Priitive Skills is another favorite of mine. I really appreciate the effort and skill that many of the Paleo craftsmen have gained and exhibit. Mark, to be simplistic about it, takes rocks, sticks, and bones and turns them into fully functional tools and.... works of art! There's no other way to describe it. Some of his creations are not only lethal, but beautiful in form. I noticed that he hasn't posted in quite some time, so I've sent him an email to see what's up!

A Woodsman's Wanderings & Rambleings is new to me, and I found it through Primitive Point. Joel is a wood carver and bladesmith who makes all of his own working knives. He has several excellent articles and tutorials. To the right you will see an awesome set that Joel was commisioned to put together. That littke package there is pretty close to an ultimate outdoorsman's set. I think it's the cat's pajamas. The heavier bush knife is great for those things that require a little heft, while the skinner can handle all the other lighter tasks. Beautifuly executed!


I have several more that I would like to share with you all, but I have (as usual) run plum out of time again! As I write this it is 0401hours Saturday morning here in Herat province, the natives are restless, and I only have a few minutes to spend with you.

As we enter the holiday seasons, please be safe and secure.
Be alert; keep your eyes open and pay attention!
Complacency will get you hurt, or worse!
We can't be everywhere all of the time; you must take responsibility for your own safety!
Be especially vigilant when you are in crowded, popular places!
Do not be afraid. Be smart, be vigilant!

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Shindand Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

Albert Rasch,HunterThough he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.

Friday, November 26, 2010

Shooting or Hunting: An Ethical Question

© 2009, 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.


Hello Everyone! Once again this is work in progress. We will continue to modify, add, and refine as the conversation continues. You will notice that I have added permanent links somewhere over there to the right.
Albert

Last week we delved into the High Fence and Preserve Hunting question. Again I wanted to thank all of you for participating so enthusiastically and professionally. You do all sportsmen a great honor and service.

After carefully reading the post and comments, the impression is that the real question is about the ethics of shooting behind fences or enclosures. Is it ethical to shoot an animal in an enclosure and still call it hunting? Several comments were made questioning the ethics of doing so. But careful review of the conversation yielded no reasons for questioning the ethics of the activity. I might venture to say that it is reasonable to say that one man's ethics are another's moral morass.

At this point ethics and morals seem to be intertwined so tightly as to be indistinguishable. The easiest way to separate them is to define them. Morals are something that we all agree upon ie: killing for the sake of killing is wrong; broad general ideas. Whereas ethics are our method for assuring a moral outcome to any of our actions, or how we define our values. Those of you that are philosophy majors or philosophers please feel free to correct my definitions.

I propose that we dissect what transpires when we pull the trigger. At what point do we have to consciously make a decision as to whether the shot is righteous or not. Is there an ethical checklist that one must complete if and when he is to pull the trigger? Does it matter if you are feeding your family or killing for horns and antlers. What are the objective values that we need in order to make an ethical kill.

Much of it is subjective. Do you consciously decide if pulling the trigger will be ethical when it's a rat? Most will strive to humanely end the rodent' s life by shooting carefully and with purpose. Some would be satisfied with any thing that will end the creatures life now or later, as long a sit dies.

It becomes stickier when the competitive nature of the human race comes into play. You've paid $4500 for a three day guided Mule Deer hunt. You brought the wife along, and she's been fawning over the rugged, broad shouldered guide. You know that your comfort zone is inside of 125 yards. Your guide gets you to just inside of 270 yards on a broad racked 4X4. He puts down his laser range finder and tells you it is 270 yards. He says it's big and tells you to take the shot. He puts his 10X Stetson down for your rifle to rest on for God's sake.

What do you do?

That would be determined by your definition of right or wrong, your ethics.

Is it a 30/30 or 300 Winchester Magnum.
Your knowledge of the ballistics table.
Have you any experience at 300 yards
Can you whip the guide if you mess it up and he chortles about it up at the lodge.
In front of the other hunters... and your wife.

Well maybe that last one doesn't count, but I sure as hell would add it to my equation.

I don't care how big the deer is, if I had a Winchester 94 in thirty-thirty I wouldn't shoot. That's the extent of my decision making process on that particular scenario. I know what I'm capable of and I leave it at that. Whereas with my Weatherby 30/06 I might consider the shot determined by the particular scenario.

Now, if I am in an enclosed property, it would depend upon my perception of whether I earned that deer ; did I work for it. First thing, why am I there? In my particular case, it wouldn't be for a magnificent specimen of that species. No, I would either be shooting culls for meat, or hunting a representative example of the species.

If I was shooting for meat I wouldn't take the shot. I'm there for meat not a big deer. If I was there for antlers, I would take the shot assuming in this case that I had fulfilled my personal criteria for an acceptable hunting experience, and I was comfortable with the probability of that shot.

"A Trophy is a Trophy is a Trophy, and to each his own." Adds Mike Riddle of Native Hunt. "My Trophy might not make P&Y or B&C or S.C.I. books but, it will always remain "MY" Trophy each and every time I look upon it, and reflect on that particular hunt while reliving the most vivid of memories which are conjured up from that hunt."

My primary game species is the feral hog. Most of the time hogs are baited, but in my particular case, I ambush them on their way to the bait, that's what I prefer. I've also ridden in doorless vehicles, four wheelers, and on horseback in pursuit of them, and chased them with dogs. Many of these hunts are less than an hour long from start to finish, but they are hunting expeditions none the less. Personally I have never shot an animal from a vehicle moving vehicle. But I have dismounted and stalked into position to take a killing shot.

Traditions also play an important factor in what we consider ethical. In the south, you chase deer with dogs. When I moved here I was aghast! Up north you shoot dogs that chase deer! But after consideration of the effect, the traditions, and the sport, I concluded that it was just another method of hunting. Interestingly enough I consider hunting hog, bear, or lions with hounds the height of hunting. Well, the height would be wild boar, hounds, horses and lances, but you get what I mean.

In some areas up north you can bait bear. That is an acceptable means of hunting for those areas. If the management goals of that area were negatively impacted by the practice then it is well within the scope of scientists in the management division to curtail the practice. It is not acceptable for others to deny the practice because they feel it is unethical.

The Hodgeman, as always, does a great job of illustrating the discussion:

"When we step outside of our culture and examine hunting traditions of other cultures the ideas get more outside our realm of experience. When I first moved to Alaska and saw some of the hunting practices in Western AK I was appalled. Shooting swimming caribou from boats, baiting bears, setnets, killing whales- among other things. It took me a while to realize this was a trip to the "store" and the people involved didn't want the experience to be "sporting" because it was their method of survival. Is it ethical- certainly. Moral- I think so. Is it for me- no."

"What passes as ethical for a resident of the Y-K delta who's surviving from nature suddenly becomes unethical if I do it- because its not ethical in the culture I exist in."

"Common practices in my culture- catch and release fishing, shooting large bulls not fit for consumption, even fair chase are looked at as disrespectful of nature from a subsistence perspective."

Hodge, thanks for helping refine the discussion.

Though I have absolutely no interest in ever (Well, the opportunity hasn't come up...) harpooning a whale, I appreciate the skill and the Inuit hunter's natural acumen when pursuing them. I also respect the scientists who determine what numbers may be taken, as long as it's science and not politics determining the numbers.

If we were to carefully analyze most situations that we commonly come into contention, we would find that in the end it is not you or I that can honestly say whether the action or activity is "hunting." Only the person in that moment, in that experience, can truly decide whether it is or isn't hunting.

My good friend and Black Powder enthusiast Rick Kratzke (Whitetail Woods ) has given some thought to how he defines his ethics.

"Ethics is a tricky word, but what I will tell you from my experience is this:
  1. I don't shoot unless I feel I can make the shot.
  2. I take pride in following the laws and regulations set forth by the state I live in.
  3. I don't harvest anything unless I intend to eat it
  4. I don't harvest anymore than I can consume in one year unless I am donating it to the homeless.
  5. I can honestly say I have passed up deer when I could have shot, but didn't, because it was not legal to do so.

Now I know everyone has there own definition of what ethics means to them, but in the end if you hunt legally and harvest humanely, (the least amount of suffering to the animal), then you have done right."

An excellent synopsis of one person's ethical criteria for squeezing the trigger.

If you don't desire to participate in a particular form of hunting, or if you disapprove of a certain practice, then you are well within your rights to discuss it with others. But to discredit it or make claims that you cannot substantiate, that is wrong. We have enough opponents without making more of them within our own ranks.

I want to close with this, an observation from Holly Heyser, our own NorcalCazadora.

"If you let people argue about methods of killing (beyond the essential mandate of avoid cruelty/excessive suffering), they forget the simple fact that 96.8 percent of American adults eat things that used to have beating hearts. Wrap yourself in complicated ethical schemes and it becomes easier to marginalize some hunters; define hunting as one method in a larger system in which humans eat animals, and suddenly you can't separate us from the non-hunters - the only remaining divide is vegetarian v. meat eater, and we WAY outnumber the vegetarians."

Among the many things that we need:
  • Scholarly works that we should all be familiar with. Holly Heyser has a post on must read texts on hunting traditions and philosophies: "Books About Hunting ..."
  • Solid science in layman's terms for all of us to be able to grasp easily and use in our own defense.
Again this is a work in progress. I'll be adding to it as the discussion builds. Thank you everyone for your participation an help!

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Shindand Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles


Albert Rasch,HunterThough he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.

Thursday, November 25, 2010

On Thanksgiving Day

My friends,

Far from home and the loving embrace of my family, I ask you not to think of me, but think of those who sacrifice everything for everyone:

Give thanks to all the men and women serving our great Nation.

Give thanks to all who have given their all,
and who continue to give their all.

Give thanks to those that have made the ultimate sacrifice.

"Let us not ask God why men such as this should die in war...
Rather let us thank God that such men lived."
General George S. Patton, Jr.

Set a plate with all dignity, care, and respect for those that should be at our tables of plenty. Remember them as the bounty of our great Nation is before you.

Respectfully, your friend,
Albert A Rasch

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

The Range Reviews: Century Matchless Deluxe Stainless Stove

© 2009, 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.

Outdoor Cooking: Century Stove

Century Matchless Deluxe Stainless Steel 2-Burner Grill and Stove

With cooking outdoors as our current theme, I thought I would share this beauty I picked up a few of years ago. Though I prefer to cook on a wood fire, there are many times and situations where an open fire is inadvisable. The Century Stainless Steel Stove is darn near matchless in quality and works perfectly in those situations. When we go fishing, we bring plenty of charcoal and wood, but the Century is put in the back of the car where it takes up very little space, and affords us the ability to whip up a complete hot meal regardless of weather conditions.

Specifications:
  • Hose length: 24"
  • Weight: 13 lbs
  • Fuel: Propane
  • BTUs: 10,000 per burner
  • Dimensions: Height 13" by Width 22" by 4" in depth

It has fold out windscreens that shield the the cooking area, making it a breeze to work in a, well,  breeze. The burners are in a great position and allow the use of two large pots, or a good sized skillet and a big pot at the same time. The grills are strong and hold large full pots well.

The surface beneath the burners is easy to clean. Always a plus when I am cooking! The metal grill over the top is easily removed and allows one to clean any spills underneath the burners.

Cooking on it is very easy. It puts out more than enough heat to boil a pot of pasta or rice, or get a skillet hot enough to make bacon, fry fish, or prepare fajitas.

It uses a standard one liter can of gas, that is good for four or five meals. There is an adapter should you desire to run it off a 20 pound container. That's a handy thing to have if you live in an area that is prone to power outages or gas shutoffs due to storms.

Though it is a bit heavy, it is very stable, and once set up you don't have to worry about it moving or tipping. This is great for car camping or as an emergency or secondary cooking surface. The controls are functional and work as expected.

I would rate this a solid buy.

Century Outdoor Camping Products
4980 Deluxe Stainless Steel 2-Burner Stove

Street Price: $74.99 - $90.00

Century Tool & Manufacturing / Kay Home Products
90 McMillen Road
Antioch, Illinois 60002
Phone: 800-635-3831
Fax: 847-395-3305

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Shindand Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Nebraska Hunting Outfitters: Last Chance Buck: Hunting Nebraska's Whitetail Deer

My good friend Scott Croner called me all the way out here in Afghanistan to brag about a beauty of a whitetail that he was lucky enough to get a shot at!

Scott, an accomplished outfitter, field measured the buck. He estimates that it weighed 300 lbs, and green scored a solid 150!

Please stop by and check it out at:
Last Chance Buck: Hunting Nebraska's Whitetail Deer

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch™
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles: Afghanistan, Permaculture, and Beekeeping

Monday, November 22, 2010

Meanwhile, South of the Border...

© 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.

I don't usually post anything political...

But when I get wind of something like this, I just have to throw it out there for everyone to see, and allow the light of day to shine on it!

"The Obama Administration plans to withdraw National Guard troops from the Texas, New Mexico and California borders by the end February under a new Southwest security plan, even as turmoil in Mexican border cities grows, according to documents obtained by The Washington Examiner."

At a time when we need to secure the border more than ever, he, the great "Hope," decided that the border is secure enough! Really? Are you serious Barrack Hussien? Dude get with the program, it's really bad down there, you must be getting the same briefs I do, probably better. If you're not, you need to have a talk with Bin Biden and get him crack a lackin on it!

Read more at the Washington Examiner: Obama Plans...

Remind me again someone. Whose side is he really on?

Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member: Shindand Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...

Back to Basics: Cooking Outdoors

© 2010 Albert A Rasch and
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
$g&m f9bd 45kd q!?5.

Back to Basics With the Chronicles:
Camp Cooking

Using a camp stove is a great and very convenient way to prepare a good meal while out in the field. But it can be just as easy and in some ways simpler to use methods and techniques that our pioneer parents used. Whether on a skewer, directly on the coals or a stone, in a pot, or using a Dutch oven, you can prepare just as delicious a meal as if you were at home.

Besides the obvious need for food, condiments, and maybe a small set of pots or pans, you really need to have a good idea of how to build and maintain a good fire with a solid, deep, bed of coals. Use good seasoned hardwoods, and have plenty of it available for the whole of the cooking operation. You certainly do not want to be half way throughyour cooking and find yourself short of firewood.

Another option is to stock up on lump charcoal. Pressed charcoal is a possibility, but... I don't know, it seems a little unnatural to me. Having said that, I've used the large size pressed charcoal to good effect when I couldn't get any lump. Anyway, you can also use hickory, mesquite, or fruitwood chips to add a subtle undertone to your food's taste.

You should know know the basics by now, but for some of our new readers, especially our new friends from the urban areas of our great and wonderful United States, I am going to go over the steps of building a good hardwood fire.

Boy Scouts will tell you, you need tinder, kindling, and fuel. Tinder as defined by Wikipedia is "easily combustible material used to ignite fires by rudimentary methods. A small fire consisting of tinder is then used to ignite kindling." Tinder may consist of paper, wood shavings, pine needles, dry weeds, and pretty much anything else that will catch a spark or flame and light up. After that, it is just a matter of carefully feeding it progressively larger pieces of wood until you have a good bed of coals built up. Start with thin twigs or slivers of wood no larger than a match stick, and as they catch add pencil thick pieces. As they catch and become small coals, continue to add wood in larger sizes and proportions until your wrist sized hunks of wood are lit and turning into coals.

Once you've got a good fire going, your whole family can become cooks in their own right by using a stick! The simplest method, short of just throwing your food in the fire, is cooking on a stick. Quite frankly, it's probably my favorite technique.

Children in particular seem to enjoy it as much if not more than the adults, as they are participants in cooking their own food. Be forewarned, if they are anything like I was when I was young, you will have many items in the fire, flaming brands, and the occasional burnt tongue.

It doesn't hurt to come prepared with some pre-cut branches, or home made skewers. You can even purchase some dowels, drill a hole in the end, and stick a long, heavy wire in the hole to act as a skewer. I have also seen extendable skewers in the BBQ section of the big box stores. Squirrel cookers are an excellent addition to your outdoor cutlery and equipment:. You can get hand forged ones for less than $20.00!

Photo Credit: Shea's Mountain
Hand Forged Squirrel Cooker

(I've had several inquiries about the squirrel cooker. I didn't make this particular one, but if you would like one please go to Shea's Mountain and see their Hand Forged Squirrel Cooker $19.99. Rev, the owner of Shea's Mountain is an accomplished Horner, member of the Honorable Company of Horners, and the Moderator of The Horner's Bench.


If you prepare your meat and vegetables ahead of time, you can skewer up shish-kebobs very quickly. I would suggest that you cook the meat seperately from the vegetable, that way you can have hot crisp vegetables and meat done to your liking. Otherwise the veggies will be overcooked while you wait for the meat to be done.

Of course, there is always the classic hotdog. Nothing beats a well cooked hotdog on a skewer. But don't stop there; try cooking Brats, Italian and Polish sausages, or Kielbasa on a stick! You will be amazed at the wonderful aromas as the grease drips into the fire, and the wonderful smokiness of the flame broiled delights.

You can make fresh bread by taking dough and spiraling it down the skewer and back up again. place it over the fire, and turn it frequently.

You can also cook in the fire too. Double wrap husked corn with a pat of butter in aluminum foil, or poke holes in a big baking potato with a fork, and wrap it too. Even fruit, apples and pears in particular, can be cooked in the same fashion; all it takes is about fifteen to twenty minutes and they're done. If you can imagine it, you can probably cook it in the coals!

One of the methods that I like to use, especially with bigger cuts of meat, is to wrap the meat in foil, then a thick layer of wet newspaper. Let em explain more fully.

Let's say you've taken down a large hog, and you would like to cook a whole leg roast for a party. Yu can use this with chicken, turkey, ham, or wild game by the way.  Prepare the cut in any fashion that pleases you. I prefer to stab it and stuff it with garlic. Now salt it well with coarse salt. Here are a couple of preparation options. Lay out several sheets of aluminum foil that are long enough to comfortably wrap around the roast, and fold and crimp with ease. Slice oranges and lemons, and place a layer of them on top the foil. Place your roast on the slices and continue to cover the roast with moe of the citrus slices. Carefully wrap the roast in the aluminum foil, leaving an opening on top. Use either white wine, or beer, and pour all 12 ounces onto the roast. Finish sealing the foil package.

It is very important to have set aside a good quantity of wood for this project. Dig a pit 12 inches wider than ou roast; set the dirt to one side on a tarp.  Start you fire in the pit, and pile on the wood. While you wait for it to burn down into coals, take your roast and wrap it in about a half an inch of newspaper. If you wet the newspaper, it makes it much easier, and helps to slow down the carbonization of the paper.

When there is a good bed of coals at least a three to four inches deep, carefully scrape out a depression in the coals, and place the roast on the coals. At the very top of the roast scrape at the wet paper until you get to the foil. Take a thumb thick piece of wood, sharpen it into a stake, and poke it through the exposed foil. Leave it standing there while you carefully and quickly, add fist sized chunks of wood to the fire untill your roast is well covered with dry, seasoned wood.

Layer several pieces of foil over the whole affair; two or three in one direction, and a couple of more ninety degrees to the first. Your wooden stake should be sticking straight up. Carefully cover your soon to be deliciously cooked roast with the soil you removed, starting on the edges, and working your way towards the center. Leave the top couple of inches uncovered, the stake standing proud.

Let it cook for about six hours, checking every couple of hours just to be sure nothing has gone awry. A big meat thermometer is pretty handy to make sure everything is cooked properly.

When it is time to uncover your masterpiece, carefully brush away the dirt, and just as carefully lift out the foil wrapped delight. Big thick gloves would be appropriate about now. Don't forget to dispose of the foil, and replace all the dirt. Leave everything as you found it!

Something that I am still learning to use is a Dutch oven.


Dutch oven cooking is a classic skill that is now becomeing more wide spread. A century ago, the majority of people knew how to use one and cook any number of dishes with it. With a Dutch oven and some new cooking skills, you can create delicious dishes: soups and stews come to mind, but you can bake bread, and desserts can also be made in these covered cook pot.

Dutch ovens have a flat bottom and three legs that hold the oven above the coals. The flanged lid is wide and flat, and is designed to hold coals. It also has a bail, makeing it easy to hang from a tripod over a fire.

You can avoid problems while cooking by keeping a eye on your oven, and by folowing a couple of easy rules of thumb. If you have a stream of steam escaping your Dutch oven, then you are probably just a little too hot. Adjust the temperature by removing some coals out from under the oven. Another great hint or technique, is to turn the oven ninety degrees every ten to fifteen minutes. Lift the lid slightly, and turn the oven; this way you avoid any hotspots that may scorch or burn your meal.

There are many assets on the internet that cover Dutch oven cooking. I have perused many of them, and find their advice indispensible. If I have a single complaint about Dutch Ovens, it is that they are too darn heavy to back pack in, unless you are with a large enough party that can divide the load. Otherwise you just can't warrant the use of one no matter how good it is!

With a little imagination and a good fire, there is no limits to the different and delicious ways you can prepare food out in the field.


Best Regards,
Albert A Rasch
Member:Shindand Tent Club
Member: Hunting Sportsmen of the United States HSUS (Let 'em sue me.)
The Hunt Continues...


Albert Rasch,HunterThough he spends most of his time writing and keeping the world safe for democracy, Albert was actually a student of biology. Really. But after a stint as a lab tech performing repetitious and mind-numbing processes that a trained capuchin monkey could do better, he never returned to the field. Rather he became a bartender. As he once said, "Hell, I was feeding mice all sorts of concoctions. At the club I did the same thing; except I got paid a lot better, and the rats where bigger." He has followed the science of QDM for many years, and fancies himself an aficionado. If you have any questions, or just want to get more information, reach him via TheRaschOutdoorChronicles(at)MSN(dot)com.